Just say no to free turkey

November 11, 2011
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Austin has a turkey problem.

Every year around the holidays and political elections, our local elected officials deliver free turkeys to potential voters. One cannot underestimate the power of the turkey. Elections have been won and lost over the size, quality and quantity of turkey.

The magic of the turkey to rule over neighborhoods is well known and understood. These magical birds have brought around many a dissatisfied resident to the turkey giver’s point of view. Even churches and organizations have been silenced by these powerful birds. Even “Angry birds” portrayed in the games of the same name have  got nothing on these mystical beasts

We’re still trying to determine the source of these birds. There have been suggestions in the past that we contact city hall since in years past they purchased them in bulk. These turkeys have silenced whole communities that have endured inaction by its leaders, injustice by local government, acceptance of poor schools, crime in the streets, broken sidewalks, poor lighting, no grocery stores, trash in the streets and yes, absent investment even with funds generated by our own tax dollars.

Join the Central Austin Neighborhood Association in our on-going turkey hunt … find your voice … ruffle some feathers … volunteer in your community. Don’t be silent about issues that affect us all.

We must eradicate these vicious birds in Austin before its too late.

In coming weeks, we’ll address the chicken problem.

2 thoughts on “Just say no to free turkey

  1. Wow, funny, but I think it’s so true. I was just telling someone the other day about how I believe “freebies” in our community are used to buy political power. I know there are so many people in Austin who really could use a free turkey or a free anything else, but somehow, I feel that most of the kindness aimed at less fortunate Austin residents is just a bit tinged with influence. So not cool when people are targeted to be taken advantage of.

    If officials feel they have to give away gifts to people in order to gain their attention and trust, I would be wary of their abilities and capabilities towards the community. This raises serious ethical issues.

    However, there are so many people in Austin, who may be struggling and either don’t understand or don’t care about the motives behind gifts–as long as it’s free, it’s alright.

    I once lived in the Northeast, where a very popular elected official was accused of providing his ward residents with beer and fried chicken, just to maintain their votes. I won’t name any names, but it’s atrocious and this person has been able to bounce back into office time and time again after scandals. It’s so sad because his ward is not in any better condition today, than it was when he was buying votes. What a betrayal!

    Thanks, Mr. Reid, for sharing your opinion.

  2. I believe that many residents in our community would prefer a job opportunity and a quality education for their children rather than a free turkey dinner. It is very sad that our community lacks the financial resources to develop and prosper economically. It is sad that millions of dollars are being wasted on programs that do not support the masses. Additionally, it is troubling that the CEO’s of Fannie Mac and Freddie Mac are receiving huge bonuses when our community is facing a housing financial crisis and unending foreclosure problem.

    Melanie Nuby

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